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Tips for Certified Cybersecurity Professionals to Find Jobs

cybersecurity jobThere are many ways to land a job that requires the CISSP (Certified Information Systems Security Professional) or any other cybersecurity certification. In this post, I share three methods to empower you to find your ideal job, leveraging your CISSP (or any other) certification. I hope these techniques enable you to land a job in cybersecurity that resonates with you.

I use CISSP throughout this example. You can easily use this tactic with other cybersecurity certifications, such as the Security+.

#1: Research CISSP Job Openings

cissp jobs

You should research CISSP job openings for where you are considering moving or the location you are seeking a job. According to CyberSeek, there are currently 77,492 open jobs in the United States that require the CISSP certification. Of the 77,492 open CISSP jobs, 2,031 are in the Public Sector, and 75,465 are in the Private Sector.

 

Job openings in the United States that require the CISSP certification. The orange number represents CISSP certification holders.

The blue number represents openings requesting the CISSP.

If you live in Arkansas and want to stay in Arkansas, as an example, there are 265 open CISSP jobs in the entire state of Arkansas.

If you want to move to Texas, for example, there are 6,333 open CISSP jobs in Texas.

#2: Determine Which Organizations Hire People with the CISSP Certification

This technique involves you actively seeking a CISSP job.

There are several paths you can take:

  1. you can work for the DoD as an actual DoD employee (civilian or military)

  2. you can work for the DoD as a contractor

  3. you can work in the private sector

Steps to become part of the DoD as a DoD civilian or member of the military are beyond the scope of this article. I will focus on numbers two and three above. If you are seeking a job as a DoD contractor or in the private sector, the process is the same because private companies that have DoD contracts hire DoD contractors. Private companies also hire CISSPs for private sector work.

A good place to determine which companies are hiring CISSPs is indeed.com. As of this writing, there are 13,469 open CISSP jobs in the United States.

According to indeed.com, the company Deloitte has 514 open CISSP jobs, and Washington, DC has 765 openings for people with the CISSP certification.

Another source to determine which organizations are hiring CISSPs is LinkedIn. Search “CISSP” on LinkedIn and set the focus of the results to “Jobs.”

As you can see from the screenshot, there are 25,997 open jobs in the United States that required the CISSP certification.

#3: Update your LinkedIn profile with your CISSP certification

This technique involves you passively seeking a CISSP job.

Many employers, recruiters, and headhunters use LinkedIn to search for people with the CISSP certification. Listing your CISSP certification on your LinkedIn profile will make you show up in searches for “CISSP.”

In the screenshot above, I searched for CISSP, then switched the results to “People.” As you notice, one guy even listed “Studying for CISSP Exam” in his LinkedIn “Headline” and he showed up. The second person put it after their name, like “John Smith, CISSP”. The third person listed the CISSP certification as their LinkedIn Headline. Any of these approaches work to get the attention of employers, recr

uiters, and headhunters. Just be prepared to be bombarded with “incredible opportunities” and lots of new connection requests.

Conclusion

I hope you find these strategies useful in your hunt for your ideal cybersecurity job. Best of luck!

LinkedIn Tips for a Better Cybersecurity Job

cybersecurity jobLand a new and better cybersecurity job with these LinkedIn tips.

It is a fact that employers, recruiters, and headhunters use LinkedIn to search for people with a cybersecurity certification, such as the CISSP or Security+. We can use this fact to our advantage!

In this article, I focus on a tactic that advertises your credentials to all LinkedIn users. Rather than actively work to find a job and seek out opportunities, this method brings opportunities to you!

In the screenshots in this article, we use the CISSP credential as an example, but you can easily replace “CISSP” with “Security+”, “CEH”, “PMP”, or whatever you want. All we are really doing is adding searchable data to our profile that may be of interest to a prospective employer.

For example, listing your CISSP certification on your LinkedIn profile will make you show up in searches for “CISSP”, as shown below.

LinkedIn search for CISSP, sorted by People.

linkedin cybersecurity

In the screenshot above, I searched for CISSP, then switched the results to “People”. There are two methods you can use to show up in these searches – (1) change your LinkedIn Headline and (2) change your LinkedIn name. If you want to be really proud (loud) about your credentials, you can even change both your headline and name.

linkedin profile

Where to change your LinkedIn Headline, which shows up beneath your name in search results.

LinkedIn Headline

The first person in the results example above doesn’t even have a CISSP certification. He listed “Studying for CISSP Exam”, in his headline. The LinkedIn Headline is what shows up beneath your name.

Listing “Studying for…” might pique the interest of some desperate headhunters. The fact of the matter is “Studying for the CISSP Exam” doesn’t mean anything though, other than you don’t have the CISSP certification. I personally think it is silly when people list “Studying for…..” or “In Pursuit of…”, but that’s me.

The third person listed the CISSP certification as their LinkedIn Headline.

LinkedIn Name change – BEFORE

LinkedIn Name

The second person put CISSP after their name, like “John Smith, CISSP”. This is effective. Some people even list multiple certifications after their name, such as “John Smith, CISSP, CEH, Hacker, Cat-Lover, Ninja”. It’s up to you. Some creativity may generate more interest.

How to add the title to your LinkedIn name. I suggest using something other than “Dude” 🙂
What LinkedIn profile looks like after “Dude” added to the name.

Conclusion

Any of these approaches work to get the attention of employers, recruiters, and headhunters. Just be prepared to be bombarded with “incredible opportunities” and lots of new connection requests, even ones that don’t make sense, based on your current role, like the sample I received today:

Sample headhunter LinkedIn message.

It’s apparent many recruiters take a shotgun approach and don’t bother to look at the prospect’s current role. I don’t have any credentials listed in my profile headline or name either, but I still get a couple of these per week.

I hope you find these strategies useful in your hunt for your ideal career.

Check out my book “The Smartest Person in the Room” to pick up some much-needed EQ skills for cybersecurity. People skills are actually more important than technical skills.

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